4 Email Marketing No-No’s (And How to Avoid Them)

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  • 8 February, 2017

Ever clicked to send emails to your subscribers, only to notice that something is quite off? The links aren’t working, the email disappears on the way or you get no clicks whatsoever? Don’t worry, email mishaps happen to everyone, but let’s see what we can do about it. Our video gives you 4 of the most common mistakes – and the solution to the problem.

4 Email Marketing Mistakes and How to Avoid Them

1. You’re Not Mobile

Half of all internet traffic is mobile and Google announced that they’re are optimizing their searches for mobile-friendly pages. It’s time for us to have mobile-friendly email as well. Why? Well, if we don’t have it, the email is gonna look quite funky on mobile – images and text are cropped and your call-to-actions might not even work at all. This means that we should go for a responsive design, where the email is automatically fitted to any screen on any device. That’s how you don’t miss out on valuable clicks.

We’re not done here, though – we need to think about content as well. Content that’s perfect for a desktop display might not be the best choice for the mobile user. Prioritize the content that best adapts to the mobile screen, and use that to build a mobile-friendly email. Again, optimize the mobile version to optimize your click-through rate.

2. Link and Personalization Fail

Turns out, all your call-to-action direct your readers to 404-pages and your try at using personalization results in a subject line that reads “Hi First Name!” Can you say awkward? I know this sounds obvious, but a mention of this can’t hurt (it is often overlooked, you know). Always send a test email to yourself before the big send out, faulty links are one of the worst pet peeves ever. Also, make sure the email looks good on other devices as well – we’re going mobile, remember?

3. You Didn’t Ask for Permission

Blasting away thousands of emails to people that have never heard from you before – they’re just gonna report you as spam since they have no clue who you are. Not only does it look unprofessional, but you also risk being blocked from sending any emails at all. The solution? First off, don’t ever buy an email list – unless you want to hit the fast track to email marketing failure. Secondly, according to email regulations, you need your subscribers’ permission to email them. Have the subscribers themselves give you their email address via opt-in forms on your site, social media, webinars, events, etc.

4. You Don’t Know Who You’re Emailing

Each one of your subscribers is in different situations, leading different lives and in need of different types of content from you. The dog owner is probably not very interested in your offer on cat food. The key here is to get to know your readers by creating buyer personas, realistic but fictional profiles of your subscribers. Create these personas by interviewing and surveying your readers. Eventually, when you have your personas, do some serious list segmentation. Divide your readers into different groups according to, for example, interests, location, lifestyles and so on. That’s how you can send relevant content to each one of your groups.

What’s your worst marketing fail?

Josefine Stengård

Josefine Stengård

Digital Marketing Manager at eMarketeer
Josefine oversees strategies, production and processes for all content marketing efforts, including social media, email and blog. She also introduced videos into their content marketing strategy, in which she shares her best tips on different marketing topics.
Josefine Stengård

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2 Comments

  • Casey says:

    Great post. These mistakes are quite common. It’s very important these days to have mobile friendly websites and campaigns. There’s nothing more annoying than unresponsive webpage! It’s good to have some tools to make these stuff easier. I’m using getresponse for my landing pages, newsletters and marketing automation.

    • Thank you, I’m glad you like the post! I absolutely agree with you, non-mobile friendly emails are a big pet peeve of mine. And it’s not only about the design, but also what content works on mobile. The same text or content for a desktop version, might not work as well for the mobile version.

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